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J Pediatr. 2019 Dec;215:123-131.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.08.029. Epub 2019 Oct 8.

Parental Obesity and Offspring Pubertal Development: Project Viva.

Author information

1
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Singapore. Electronic address: Izzuddin_Aris@harvardpilgrim.org.
2
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA.
3
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA; Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore; Obstetrics and Gynecology Academic Clinical Program, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore.
4
Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Maine Medical Center, Portland, ME; Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Portland, ME.
5
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA; Diabetes Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA.
6
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Canada; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Canada.
7
Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, MA; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association of preconception parental obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m2) with offspring pubertal development.

STUDY DESIGN:

Among 1377 children from a prospective prebirth cohort in Boston, we examined markers of puberty (age at peak height velocity [PHV], age at menarche, self-reported pubertal development score), and adrenarche (pictograph Tanner pubic hair staging). We used multivariable regression models to examine associations of maternal and paternal obesity with offspring pubertal indices, and applied marginal structural models to estimate the controlled direct effect not mediated by offspring prepubertal BMI.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of paternal obesity alone, maternal obesity alone, and biparental obesity were 10.5%, 10.1%, and 5%, respectively. After adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic factors, parental heights and maternal age at menarche, maternal obesity alone (vs neither parent with obesity) was associated with earlier age at PHV (β -0.30 years; 95% CI -0.57, -0.03) and higher early adolescent pubertal score (0.29 units; 0.10, 0.48) in boys, but not with pubertal or adrenarchal outcomes in girls. Paternal obesity alone was not associated with any outcomes in either boys or girls. Biparental obesity was associated with earlier age at PHV in boys and earlier menarche in girls. Using marginal structural models with stabilized inverse probability weighting, maternal obesity alone had significant controlled direct effects on age at PHV (-0.31 years; -0.62, 0.00) and on pubertal score (0.22 units; 0.00, 0.44) in boys, independent of prepubertal BMI.

CONCLUSION:

Maternal, but not paternal, obesity is associated with earlier pubertal development in boys, and such association is independent of prepubertal BMI.

KEYWORDS:

marginal structural model; mediation; parental obesity; pubertal development

PMID:
31604633
PMCID:
PMC6878167
[Available on 2020-12-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.08.029

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