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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 Sep 17;16(18). pii: E3445. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16183445.

Evaluation of Power Production Asymmetry during Cycling in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis.

Author information

1
Interdisciplinary School of Health Science, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. jfarrel3@uottawa.ca.
2
Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73079, USA. jfarrel3@uottawa.ca.
3
Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73079, USA. dbemben@ou.edu.
4
Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73079, USA. cblack@ou.edu.
5
Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73079, USA. larsondj@ou.edu.
6
Multiple Sclerosis Center of Excellence, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA. gabriel-pardo@omrf.org.
7
Multiple Sclerosis Center of Excellence, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA. Cecilie-Fjeldstad@omrf.org.
8
Department of Health and Exercise Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73079, USA. rdlarson@ou.edu.

Abstract

Lower limb asymmetries have been observed in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), and have been associated with mobility impairment. An incremental cycling test was performed on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power output (PPO) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). Then, participants cycled at 50%, 60%, and 70% of their PPO to assess the contribution of each lower limb to power production. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to detect group × intensity differences in power production asymmetry. Eight PwMS and six healthy individuals (Non-MS) completed the study. No statistically significant (p > 0.05) group × intensity interactions or main effects were present when examining between-limb differences in power production. The current data do not indicate a statistically significant difference in power production asymmetry between groups and exercise intensities. Previous research has established a 10% difference between contralateral limbs as a threshold for asymmetry. The average asymmetry in power production in PwMS exceeded the 10% threshold at all measured outputs, suggesting the presence of asymmetry in power production.

KEYWORDS:

asymmetry; exercise; lower extremity; multiple sclerosis; walking

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