Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2019 Aug 14. pii: glz180. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glz180. [Epub ahead of print]

Associations of brain pathology, cognitive and physical markers with age in cognitively normal individuals aged 60-102 years.

Author information

1
Alzheimer Center Amsterdam, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Biological Psychology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Radiology & Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
School of Biomedical Engineering and Imaging Sciences, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
5
Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
6
Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
7
European Society of Neuroradiology (ESNR), Institutes of Neurology and Healthcare Engineering, University College London, London, UK.
8
Department of Clinical Genetics, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
9
Department of Medicine and Aged Care, @AgeMelbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
10
Department of Human Movement Sciences, @AgeAmsterdam, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Research Institute Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
11
Department of Psychiatry & Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The prevalence of brain pathologies increases with age and cognitive and physical function worsen over the lifetime. It is unclear whether these processes show a similar increase with age. We studied the association of markers for brain pathology, cognitive and physical function with age in 288 cognitively normal individuals aged 60-102 years selected from the cross-sectional EMIF-AD PreclinAD and 90+ Study at the Amsterdam UMC. An abnormal score was consistent with a score below the 5th percentile in the 60-70 years old individuals. Prevalence of abnormal scores were estimated using generalized estimating equations (GEE) models. The prevalence of abnormal handgrip strength, the Digit Symbol Substitution Test and hippocampal volume showed the fastest increase with age and abnormal MMSE score, muscle mass and amyloid aggregation the lowest. The increase in prevalence of abnormal markers was partly dependent on sex, level of education and amyloid aggregation. We did not find a consistent pattern in which markers of brain pathology and cognitive and physical processes became abnormal with age.

KEYWORDS:

biomarkers; brain aging; cognitive function; human aging

PMID:
31411322
DOI:
10.1093/gerona/glz180

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center