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J Clin Lipidol. 2019 Jun 29. pii: S1933-2874(19)30227-2. doi: 10.1016/j.jacl.2019.06.007. [Epub ahead of print]

Race-ethnic differences in the associations of maternal lipid trait genetic risk scores with longitudinal fetal growth.

Author information

1
Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
2
Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Population Health Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: ayeleft@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Fetal growth, an important predictor of cardiometabolic diseases in adults, is influenced by maternal and fetal genetic and environmental factors.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the association between maternal lipid genetic risk score (GRS) and fetal growth among 4 US racial-ethnic populations (Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians).

METHODS:

We extracted genotype data for 2008 pregnant women recruited in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Fetal Growth Studies-Singleton cohort with up to 6 standardized ultrasound examinations. GRS was calculated using 240 single-nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with higher total cholesterol (GRSTChol), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (GRSLDLc), and triglycerides (GRSTG) and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (GRSHDLc).

RESULTS:

At 40 weeks' gestation, a unit increase in GRSTG was associated with 11.4 g higher fetal weight (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.8-20.0 g) among normal-weight Whites, 26.3 g (95% CI 6.0-46.6 g) among obese Blacks, and 30.8 g (95% CI 6.3-55.3 g) among obese Hispanics. Higher GRSHDLc was associated with increased fetal weight across 36 to 40 weeks among normal-weight Whites and across 13 to 20 weeks among normal-weight Asians, but with decreased fetal weight across 26 to 40 weeks among normal-weight Hispanics. Higher GRSTChol was suggestively associated with increased fetal weight in males and decreased in females. Associations remained consistent after adjustment for serum lipids.

CONCLUSION:

Associations between fetal weight and maternal lipid GRS appear to vary by maternal race-ethnic group, obesity status, and offspring sex. Genetic susceptibility to unfavorable lipid profiles contributes to fetal growth differences even among normal-weight women suggesting a potential future application in predicting aberrant fetal growth.

KEYWORDS:

Birth weight; Fetal growth; Genetic risk score; Maternal lipid traits

PMID:
31383602
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacl.2019.06.007

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