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Pharmacol Res. 2019 Jun 15:104311. doi: 10.1016/j.phrs.2019.104311. [Epub ahead of print]

Drug-induced endocrine blood pressure elevation.

Author information

1
Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology and Division of Molecular and Systems Toxicology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Davis, California, USA.
3
Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology and Division of Molecular and Systems Toxicology, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address: alex.odermatt@unibas.ch.

Abstract

Patients with uncontrolled hypertension are at risk for cardiovascular complications. The majority of them suffers from unidentified forms of hypertension and a fraction has so-called secondary hypertension with an identifiable cause. The patient's medications, its use of certain herbal supplements and over-the-counter agents represent potential causal factors for secondary hypertension that are often overlooked. The current review focuses on drugs that are likely to elevate blood pressure by affecting the human endocrine system at the level of steroid synthesis or metabolism, mineralocorticoid receptor activity, or by affecting the catecholaminergic system. Drugs with known adverse effects but where benefits outweigh their risks, drug candidates and market withdrawals are reviewed. Finally, potential therapeutic strategies are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase; Abiraterone; Adverse drug reaction; Carbenoxolone; Catecholamine; Danazol; Etomidate; Hypertension; Itraconazole; Ketoconazole; Lisdexamphetamine; Metyrapone; Mifepristone; Mineralocorticoid excess; Posaconazole; Steroidogenesis

PMID:
31212012
DOI:
10.1016/j.phrs.2019.104311
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