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Neuroimage. 2019 Aug 15;197:13-23. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.04.048. Epub 2019 Apr 20.

Visual temporal frequency preference shows a distinct cortical architecture using fMRI.

Author information

1
Section on Functional Imaging Methods, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: yuhui.chai@nih.gov.
2
Section on Functional Imaging Methods, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
3
Functional MRI Core, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
5
Section on Functional Imaging Methods, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; Functional MRI Core, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

Studies of visual temporal frequency preference typically examine frequencies under 20 Hz and measure local activity to evaluate the sensitivity of different cortical areas to variations in temporal frequencies. Most of these studies have not attempted to map preferred temporal frequency within and across visual areas, nor have they explored in detail, stimuli at gamma frequency, which recent research suggests may have potential clinical utility. In this study, we address this gap by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure response to flickering visual stimuli varying in frequency from 1 to 40 Hz. We apply stimulation in both a block design to examine task response and a steady-state design to examine functional connectivity. We observed distinct activation patterns between 1 Hz and 40 Hz stimuli. We also found that the correlation between medial thalamus and visual cortex was modulated by the temporal frequency. The modulation functions and tuned frequencies are different for the visual activity and thalamo-visual correlations. Using both fMRI activity and connectivity measurements, we show evidence for a temporal frequency specific organization across the human visual system.

KEYWORDS:

Connectivity; Temporal frequency; Thalamo-visual correlation; Visual frequency; fMRI

PMID:
31015027
PMCID:
PMC6591056
[Available on 2020-08-15]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.04.048

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