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BMC Genomics. 2019 Mar 29;20(1):251. doi: 10.1186/s12864-019-5602-8.

A genome-wide analysis of carbon catabolite repression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

Author information

1
Genetics, Genomics & Systems Biology, School of Biosciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. dane.vassiliadis@unimelb.edu.au.
2
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Parkville, Victoria, Australia. dane.vassiliadis@unimelb.edu.au.
3
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau, Macau, China.
4
Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Macau, Macau, China.
5
Genetics, Genomics & Systems Biology, School of Biosciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
6
Genetics, Genomics & Systems Biology, School of Biosciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. brendon.monahan@cancercrc.com.
7
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Parkville, Victoria, Australia. brendon.monahan@cancercrc.com.
8
Cancer Therapeutics (CTx), Parkville, Victoria, Australia. brendon.monahan@cancercrc.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Optimal glucose metabolism is central to the growth and development of cells. In microbial eukaryotes, carbon catabolite repression (CCR) mediates the preferential utilization of glucose, primarily by repressing alternate carbon source utilization. In fission yeast, CCR is mediated by transcriptional repressors Scr1 and the Tup/Ssn6 complex, with the Rst2 transcription factor important for activation of gluconeogenesis and sexual differentiation genes upon derepression. Through genetic and genome-wide methods, this study aimed to comprehensively characterize CCR in fission yeast by identifying the genes and biological processes that are regulated by Scr1, Tup/Ssn6 and Rst2, the core CCR machinery.

RESULTS:

The transcriptional response of fission yeast to glucose-sufficient or glucose-deficient growth conditions in wild type and CCR mutant cells was determined by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq. Scr1 was found to regulate genes involved in carbon metabolism, hexose uptake, gluconeogenesis and the TCA cycle. Surprisingly, a role for Scr1 in the suppression of sexual differentiation was also identified, as homothallic scr1 deletion mutants showed ectopic meiosis in carbon and nitrogen rich conditions. ChIP-seq characterised the targets of Tup/Ssn6 and Rst2 identifying regulatory roles within and independent of CCR. Finally, a subset of genes bound by all three factors was identified, implying that regulation of certain loci may be modulated in a competitive fashion between the Scr1, Tup/Ssn6 repressors and the Rst2 activator.

CONCLUSIONS:

By identifying the genes directly and indirectly regulated by Scr1, Tup/Ssn6 and Rst2, this study comprehensively defined the gene regulatory networks of CCR in fission yeast and revealed the transcriptional complexities governing this system.

KEYWORDS:

Carbon catabolite repression; Carbon metabolism; ChIP-seq; RNA-seq; Rst2; Schizosaccharomyces pombe; Scr1; Transcriptional regulation; Tup11

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