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Nat Commun. 2019 Mar 15;10(1):1221. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-09124-x.

Restoration of high-sensitivity and adapting vision with a cone opsin.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.
2
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR, 97239, USA.
3
Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.
4
Department of Biochemistry, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, 10024, USA.
5
Department of Biosystems Science Engineering, ETH Zürich, Mattenstrasse 26, Basel, 8092, Switzerland.
6
Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, 97239, USA.
7
School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.
8
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. ehud@berkeley.edu.
9
Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. ehud@berkeley.edu.
10
Bioscience Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA. ehud@berkeley.edu.

Abstract

Inherited and age-related retinal degenerative diseases cause progressive loss of rod and cone photoreceptors, leading to blindness, but spare downstream retinal neurons, which can be targeted for optogenetic therapy. However, optogenetic approaches have been limited by either low light sensitivity or slow kinetics, and lack adaptation to changes in ambient light, and not been shown to restore object vision. We find that the vertebrate medium wavelength cone opsin (MW-opsin) overcomes these limitations and supports vision in dim light. MW-opsin enables an otherwise blind retinitis pigmenotosa mouse to discriminate temporal and spatial light patterns displayed on a standard LCD computer tablet, displays adaption to changes in ambient light, and restores open-field novel object exploration under incidental room light. By contrast, rhodopsin, which is similar in sensitivity but slower in light response and has greater rundown, fails these tests. Thus, MW-opsin provides the speed, sensitivity and adaptation needed to restore patterned vision.

PMID:
30874546
PMCID:
PMC6420663
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-019-09124-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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