Format

Send to

Choose Destination
JACC Basic Transl Sci. 2019 Feb 25;4(1):1-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jacbts.2018.10.008. eCollection 2019 Feb.

Neutrophil Subsets, Platelets, and Vascular Disease in Psoriasis.

Author information

1
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
2
Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
3
Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York.
4
Systemic Autoimmunity Branch, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
5
Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
Department of Biostatics, Epidemiology, and Informatics, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

Psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease associated with increased cardiovascular risk and serves as a reliable model to study inflammatory atherogenesis. Because neutrophils are implicated in atherosclerosis development, this study reports that the interaction among low-density granulocytes, a subset of neutrophils, and platelets is associated with a noncalcified coronary plaque burden assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography. Because early atherosclerotic noncalcified burden can lead to fatal myocardial infarction, the low-density granulocyte-platelet interaction may play a crucial target for clinical intervention.

KEYWORDS:

CCTA, coronary computed tomography angiography; CVD, cardiovascular disease; FDR, false discovery rate; HAoEC, human aortic endothelial cell; LDG, low-density granulocyte; MI, myocardial infarction; NCB, noncalcified coronary plaque burden; NDG, normal-density granulocyte; NET, neutrophil extracellular trap; PASI, psoriasis area severity index; SLE, systemic lupus erythematosus; TB, total coronary plaque burden; cardiovascular disease; low-density granulocytes; neutrophils; platelets; psoriasis

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center