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AIDS Behav. 2019 Mar 6. doi: 10.1007/s10461-019-02449-0. [Epub ahead of print]

Barriers and Facilitators of Rapid HIV and Syphilis Testing Uptake Among Filipino Transnational Migrants in China.

Author information

1
Global and Community Mental Health Research Group, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences (E21), The University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (SAR), People's Republic of China. brianhall@um.edu.mo.
2
Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. brianhall@um.edu.mo.
3
Global and Community Mental Health Research Group, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Social Sciences (E21), The University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (SAR), People's Republic of China.
4
Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
5
Institute of Global Health and Infectious Disease, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
6
Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
7
Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

Transnational migrant workers are known to be at high risk for HIV/STIs. This study estimated the point prevalence of HIV/syphilis and examined correlates of HIV/syphilis testing uptake among female migrant domestic workers in Macao, China. Data was obtained from 1363 female Filipino domestic workers who were offered free rapid HIV and syphilis testing. A mixed methods analysis was undertaken to examine correlates of testing and themes about reasons for not testing. Among 1164 women tested, there were no cases of HIV/syphilis observed and 199 (14.6%) refused HIV/syphilis testing. Greater social integration (aOR 1.12; 95% CI 1.02-1.24), having more than one sexual partner (aOR 1.65; 95% CI 1.02-2.65), and longer working hours on the testing day (aOR 0.97; 95% CI 0.94-1.00), were associated with testing uptake. Among those who tested, the majority (> 70%) had never tested before, suggesting the need to improve testing outreach. Qualitative themes about reasons for not testing included low perceived need and insufficient time. Individual and structural testing barriers should be reduced to optimize HIV/STI testing in migrant populations.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Testing uptake; Transnational migrants; Women’s health

PMID:
30840160
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-019-02449-0

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