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Am J Emerg Med. 2019 May;37(5):937-941. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2019.02.038. Epub 2019 Feb 25.

Inclined position is associated with improved first pass success and laryngoscopic view in prehospital endotracheal intubations.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: dlmurphy@uw.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; King County Emergency Medical Services, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Seattle Fire Department, Seattle, WA, USA.
4
King County Emergency Medical Services, Seattle, WA, USA.
5
Seattle Fire Department, Seattle, WA, USA.
6
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
7
Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

In hospital-based studies, patients intubated by physicians while in an inclined position compared to supine position had a higher rate of first pass success and lower rate of peri-intubation complications. We evaluated the impact of patient positioning on prehospital endotracheal intubation in an EMS system with rapid sequence induction capability. We hypothesized that patients in the inclined position would have a higher first-pass success rate.

METHODS:

Prehospital endotracheal intubation cases performed by paramedics between 2012 and 2017 were prospectively collected in airway registries maintained by a metropolitan EMS system. We included all adult (age ≥ 18 years) non-traumatic, non-arrest patients who received any attempt at intubation. Patients were categorized according to initial positioning: supine or inclined. The primary outcome measure was first pass success with secondary outcomes of laryngoscopic view and challenges to intubation.

RESULTS:

Of the 13,353 patients with endotracheal intubation attempted by paramedics during the study period, 4879 were included for analysis. Of these, 1924 (39.4%) were intubated in the inclined position. First pass success was 86.3% among the inclined group versus 82.5% for the supine group (difference 3.8%, 95% CI: 1.5%-6.1%). First attempt laryngeal grade I view was 62.9% in the inclined group versus 57.1% for the supine group (difference 5.8%, 2.0-9.6). Challenges to intubation were more frequent in the supine group (42.3% versus 38.8%, difference 3.5%, 0.6-6.3).

CONCLUSION:

Inclined positioning was associated with a better grade view and higher rate of first pass success. The technique should be considered as a viable approach for prehospital airway management.

KEYWORDS:

Emergency medical services; Endotracheal intubation; First pass success; Patient positioning; Rapid sequence intubation

PMID:
30826211
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajem.2019.02.038

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