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Microbiol Mol Biol Rev. 2019 Feb 27;83(2). pii: e00058-18. doi: 10.1128/MMBR.00058-18. Print 2019 May 15.

Taming the Triskelion: Bacterial Manipulation of Clathrin.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia hnewton@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

The entry of pathogens into nonphagocytic host cells has received much attention in the past three decades, revealing a vast array of strategies employed by bacteria and viruses. A method of internalization that has been extensively studied in the context of viral infections is the use of the clathrin-mediated pathway. More recently, a role for clathrin in the entry of some intracellular bacterial pathogens was discovered. Classically, clathrin-mediated endocytosis was thought to accommodate internalization only of particles smaller than 150 nm; however, this was challenged upon the discovery that Listeria monocytogenes requires clathrin to enter eukaryotic cells. Now, with discoveries that clathrin is required during other stages of some bacterial infections, another paradigm shift is occurring. There is a more diverse impact of clathrin during infection than previously thought. Much of the recent data describing clathrin utilization in processes such as bacterial attachment, cell-to-cell spread and intracellular growth may be due to newly discovered divergent roles of clathrin in the cell. Not only does clathrin act to facilitate endocytosis from the plasma membrane, but it also participates in budding from endosomes and the Golgi apparatus and in mitosis. Here, the manipulation of clathrin processes by bacterial pathogens, including its traditional role during invasion and alternative ways in which clathrin supports bacterial infection, is discussed. Researching clathrin in the context of bacterial infections will reveal new insights that inform our understanding of host-pathogen interactions and allow researchers to fully appreciate the diverse roles of clathrin in the eukaryotic cell.

KEYWORDS:

Coxiella burnetii ; EPEC; Listeria monocytogenes ; Shigella flexneri ; Staphylococcus aureus ; adaptor proteins; autophagy; bacterial replication; clathrin; pathogen internalization

PMID:
30814130
DOI:
10.1128/MMBR.00058-18
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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