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Acta Neurol Scand. 2019 Feb 25. doi: 10.1111/ane.13082. [Epub ahead of print]

Emotions towards magnetic resonance imaging in people with multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Institute of Neuroimmunology and Multiple Sclerosis, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
2
Department of Neurology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany.
3
Hamburg Medical School, Hamburg, Germany.
4
Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
5
NMR Research Unit, Queen Square Multiple Sclerosis Centre, Department of Neuroinflammation, University College London (UCL) Institute of Neurology, UK.
6
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) University College London Hospitals (UCLH) Biomedical Research Centre, UK.
7
Department of Neuroradiology, St. Josef-Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany.
8
Trierer Aktionsgruppe (TAG) Multiple Sklerose, Trier, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

People with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) often have magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. While MRI can help guide MS management, it may be a source of anxiety for pwMS. We aimed to develop and validate a questionnaire on the "EMotions and Attitudes towards MRI" (MRI-EMA).

MATERIAL & METHODS:

The questionnaire was developed, tested in 2 samples of pwMS and validated in a sample of n=457 pwMS using exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).

RESULTS:

EFA revealed 4 factors underlying the questionnaire: fear of MRI scan, fear of MRI results, feeling of control over the disease and feeling of competence in the patient-physician encounter. CFA confirmed the model fit. Receiving the MRI results, but not undergoing the procedure was associated with anxiety. Seeing MRI results gave participants a feeling of control over the disease. Only 50% felt competent to discuss MRI findings with their physician. Fear of MRI results was especially high and feeling of competence low in participants with a short disease duration and little MRI experience.

CONCLUSION:

PwMS don't feel competent when discussing the role, MRI plays in their care. Receiving MRI results caused anxiety and provides some pwMS with a - perhaps false - feeling of control over the disease. The MRI-EMA constitutes a new tool for the assessments of pwMS' feelings towards MRI, that can be applied in future research and clinical settings. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

anxiety; attitude to health; emotions; magnetic resonance imaging; multiple sclerosis; questionnaire; validation

PMID:
30802931
DOI:
10.1111/ane.13082

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