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Neuro Oncol. 2019 Feb 22. pii: noz044. doi: 10.1093/neuonc/noz044. [Epub ahead of print]

Health status, Health-Related Quality of Life and Socio-economic Outcome in Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors: a German Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University Children's Hospital Bonn, Germany.
2
Department of Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, University Hospital Bonn, Germany.
3
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
4
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Augsburg, Germany.
5
Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University of Leipzig, Germany.
6
German Childhood Cancer Registry, Institute for Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University Mainz, Germany.
7
Institute for Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Münster, Germany.
8
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University Children's Hospital Lübeck, Germany.
9
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University Children's Hospital Hamburg, Germany.
10
Division of Epidemiology and Health Services Research, Institute of Medical Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Informatics, Mainz, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

With rising numbers of childhood cancer survivors, somatic and socio-economic outcome as well as the health-related quality of life (QoL) gain increasing relevance. Based on the first nationwide German Survey on Life Situation, State of Health and Quality of Life of Childhood Cancer Survivors, the VIVE-survey, we report the outcome of survivors of childhood brain tumors (BTS) localized in the posterior fossa.

METHODS:

270 participants with a median follow-up period of 21.9 years completed a questionnaire on socio-economic and somatic late-effects as well as a standardized QoL-questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Comparisons were performed between WHO I/II, WHO III/IV-BTS and the general population adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS:

The socio-economic and QoL results of WHO I/II-BTS were largely comparable to the general population while WHO III/IV-BTS were at higher risk for significantly worse outcomes. 36.8% of WHO III/IV-BTS were still living with their parents or in assisted living facilities compared to 16.1% of WHO I/II-BTS and 7.8% of the age-adjusted general population. 60.8% of WHO III/IV-BTS achieved at least an intermediate school degree in comparison to 80.5% of WHO I/II-BTS and 75.6% of the general population. WHO III/IV-BTS developed up to two times more somatic late-effects than WHO I/II.

CONCLUSION:

Derived from a large and homogenous cohort these results stress the importance of an appropriate follow-up period focusing not only on physical aspects but encompassing the entire living situation to allow patient-tailored support.

KEYWORDS:

childhood brain tumor; long-term late-effects; long-term survivors; posterior fossa; quality of life

PMID:
30793186
DOI:
10.1093/neuonc/noz044

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