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J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2019 Feb 18. doi: 10.1111/jdv.15413. [Epub ahead of print]

Association between parental autoimmune disease and atopic dermatitis in their offspring: a matched case-control study.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
2
Copenhagen Research Group for Inflammatory Skin (CORGIS), Hellerup, Denmark.
3
School of Health and Medical Science, Graduate Programme in Public Health and Epidemiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
Departments of Dermatology, Preventive Medicine, and Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.
5
Department of Cardiology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with many autoimmune diseases, in part due to overlapping genetic risk loci. While parental atopic disease is an important risk for AD in the offspring, little is known on the putative associations between parental autoimmune disease and AD in their children.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

All children born between 1996 and 2011 who received a diagnosis of AD in the hospital system before their fifth birthday were matched 1 : 10 with children from the general population. Maternal and paternal autoimmune diseases were assessed using registry-based data. Conditional logistic regression was performed on the relationships between parental autoimmune diseases and AD in their children.

RESULTS:

A total of 8589 children with AD were matched with controls. One or more autoimmune disease was identified in 5.89% (506/8589) of mothers to AD children and 3.67% (315/8589) of fathers to AD children compared to 4.85% (4163/85 890) and 3.28% (2816/85 890) in parents of control children. Maternal autoimmune disease but not paternal autoimmune disease was associated with AD in the offspring (odds ratio [OR] 1.20 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-1.32] and OR 1.08 [0.96-1.22], respectively), Two or more maternal autoimmune diseases, maternal dermatologic autoimmune disease and maternal digestive autoimmune disease were all also associated with AD development in her children (1.96 [95% CI 1.36-2.84], OR 1.60 [95% CI 1.24-2.07] and OR 1.24 [95% CI 1.06-1.45], respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

The risk of AD is influenced by many factors including atopy status and filaggrin gene mutations. In this matched case-control study, maternal autoimmune disease was associated with AD diagnosis in the offspring. Maternal dermatologic and digestive autoimmune diseases were most closely associated with subsequent AD diagnosis in the offspring.

PMID:
30779234
DOI:
10.1111/jdv.15413

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