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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2019 Feb 26;116(9):3614-3623. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1803794116. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Stage-dependent cardiac regeneration in Xenopus is regulated by thyroid hormone availability.

Author information

1
Evolution des Régulations Endocriniennes, Département Adaptation du vivant, CNRS UMR 7221, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Université, 75231 Paris, France.
2
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3052, Australia.
3
Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 3347, INSERM U1021, Centre Universitaire, F-91405 Orsay, France.
4
Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell, Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique, CNRS UMR 9198, Université Paris Sud, Saclay, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
5
Evolution des Régulations Endocriniennes, Département Adaptation du vivant, CNRS UMR 7221, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Sorbonne Université, 75231 Paris, France; coen@mnhn.fr.

Abstract

Despite therapeutic advances, heart failure is the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but why cardiac regenerative capacity is lost in adult humans remains an enigma. Cardiac regenerative capacity widely varies across vertebrates. Zebrafish and newt hearts regenerate throughout life. In mice, this ability is lost in the first postnatal week, a period physiologically similar to thyroid hormone (TH)-regulated metamorphosis in anuran amphibians. We thus assessed heart regeneration in Xenopus laevis before, during, and after TH-dependent metamorphosis. We found that tadpoles display efficient cardiac regeneration, but this capacity is abrogated during the metamorphic larval-to-adult switch. Therefore, we examined the consequence of TH excess and deprivation on the efficiently regenerating tadpole heart. We found that either acute TH treatment or blocking TH production before resection significantly but differentially altered gene expression and kinetics of extracellular matrix components deposition, and negatively impacted myocardial wall closure, both resulting in an impeded regenerative process. However, neither treatment significantly influenced DNA synthesis or mitosis in cardiac tissue after amputation. Overall, our data highlight an unexplored role of TH availability in modulating the cardiac regenerative outcome, and present X. laevis as an alternative model to decipher the developmental switches underlying stage-dependent constraint on cardiac regeneration.

KEYWORDS:

Xenopus; cardiac regeneration; extracellular matrix; metamorphosis; thyroid hormone

Comment in

PMID:
30755533
PMCID:
PMC6397552
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1803794116
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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