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Trends Immunol. 2019 Mar;40(3):197-211. doi: 10.1016/j.it.2019.01.005. Epub 2019 Feb 10.

Role of IgG3 in Infectious Diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
2
Department of Medicine, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: awchung@unimelb.edu.au.

Abstract

IgG3 comprises only a minor fraction of IgG and has remained relatively understudied until recent years. Key physiochemical characteristics of IgG3 include an elongated hinge region, greater molecular flexibility, extensive polymorphisms, and additional glycosylation sites not present on other IgG subclasses. These characteristics make IgG3 a uniquely potent immunoglobulin, with the potential for triggering effector functions including complement activation, antibody (Ab)-mediated phagocytosis, or Ab-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). Recent studies underscore the importance of IgG3 effector functions against a range of pathogens and have provided approaches to overcome IgG3-associated limitations, such as allotype-dependent short Ab half-life, and excessive proinflammatory activation. Understanding the molecular and functional properties of IgG3 may facilitate the development of improved Ab-based immunotherapies and vaccines against infectious diseases.

KEYWORDS:

IgG3; allotypes; antibody; antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity; complement; glycosylation

PMID:
30745265
DOI:
10.1016/j.it.2019.01.005

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