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Disabil Health J. 2019 Jul;12(3):443-451. doi: 10.1016/j.dhjo.2019.01.005. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Prevalence of cerebral palsy, intellectual disability, hearing loss, and blindness, National Health Interview Survey, 2009-2016.

Author information

1
Developmental Disabilities Branch, Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, MS E-86, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA. Electronic address: domcguire@stlawco.org.
2
Developmental Disabilities Branch, Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, MS E-86, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA. Electronic address: bsr4@cdc.gov.
3
Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, MS E-86, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA. Electronic address: mxy1@cdc.gov.
4
Developmental Disabilities Branch, Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, MS E-86, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA. Electronic address: ndowling@cdc.gov.
5
Developmental Disabilities Branch, Division of Congenital and Developmental Disorders, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, MS E-86, Atlanta, GA, 30341, USA. Electronic address: dqc3@cdc.gov.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Developmental disabilities are present in a significant proportion of US children. Surveillance of developmental disabilities is crucial for monitoring population trends, guiding research into risk factors, and informing resource allocation.

OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS:

We examined overall prevalence, prevalence by demographic characteristics, and trends over time for cerebral palsy (CP), intellectual disability (ID), moderate to severe hearing loss (MSHL), and blindness.

METHODS:

Data from the 2009-2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed for children 3-17 years of age. Question wording was consistent over time except for ID, which changed in 2011 to replace the term "mental retardation." Demographic differences and linear trends (over three time periods) were assessed by Chi-square tests and Wald-F tests.

RESULTS:

Prevalence estimates per 1000 children ages 3-17 years for CP, ID, MSHL, and blindness were 3.2 (95% CI: 2.7, 3.7), 11.1 (95% CI: 10.2, 12.1), 6.4 (95% CI: 5.6, 7.2), and 1.6 (95% CI: 1.3, 2.0), respectively. Disability prevalence was higher for children with low birthweight and from families of lower parental education, income ≤200% of federal poverty level, and public insurance. Older children had higher ID prevalence; boys had significantly higher CP and ID prevalences. Only ID demonstrated a significantly increased trend over time (p = 0.0002).

CONCLUSIONS:

We provide nationally representative prevalence estimates for four developmental disabilities; recent estimates are comparable to those from records-based studies. Prevalences were stable except for ID, which increased after 2010, coincident with the questionnaire change. A substantial number of US children continue to have these disabilities and service needs.

KEYWORDS:

Blindness; Cerebral palsy; Children; Hearing loss; Intellectual disability; Prevalence

PMID:
30713095
DOI:
10.1016/j.dhjo.2019.01.005

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