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J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2019 Jan 25;128:129-133. doi: 10.1016/j.yjmcc.2019.01.019. [Epub ahead of print]

Epigenetics, cardiovascular disease, and cellular reprogramming.

Author information

1
Department of Diabetes, Epigenetics in Human Health and Disease Laboratory, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. Electronic address: Keith.Al-Hasani@monash.edu.
2
Cardiovascular Research Center, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States.
3
Department of Diabetes, Epigenetics in Human Health and Disease Laboratory, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Hong Kong Institute of Diabetes and Obesity, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region.

Abstract

Under the seeming disorder of "junk" sequences the last decade has seen developments in our understanding of non-coding RNA's (ncRNAs). It's a complex revised order and nowhere is this more relevant than in the developing heart whereby old rules have been set aside to make room for new ones. The development of the mammalian heart has been studied at the genetic and cellular level for several decades because these areas were considered ideal control points. As such, detailed mechanisms governing cell lineages are well described. Emerging evidence suggests a complex new order regulated by epigenetic mechanisms mark cardiac cell lineage. Indeed, molecular cardiologists are in the process of shedding light on the roles played by ncRNAs, nucleic acid methylation and histone/chromatin modifications in specific pathologies of the heart. The aim of this article is to discuss some of the recent advances in the field of cardiovascular epigenetics that are related to direct cell reprogramming and repair. As such, we explore ncRNAs as nodes regulating signaling networks and attempt to make sense of regulatory disorder by reinforcing the importance of epigenetic components in the developmental program.

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