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AIDS Behav. 2019 May;23(5):1368-1374. doi: 10.1007/s10461-019-02404-z.

MSM Behavior Disclosure Networks and HIV Testing: An Egocentric Network Analysis Among MSM in China.

Cao B1,2,3, Saffer AJ4, Yang C5, Chen H6, Peng K7, Pan SW2,3,8, Durvasula M9, Liu C2,3,10, Fu H11, Ong JJ3,12, Tang W2,3,13, Tucker JD14,15,16,17.

Author information

1
School of Media and Communication, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
2
University of North Carolina Project-China, Guangzhou, China.
3
Social Entrepreneurship to Spur Health (SESH), Guangzhou, China.
4
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA.
5
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA.
6
Department of Media and Communication, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
7
Faculty of Humanities and Arts, Macau University of Science and Technology, Taipa, Macau, China.
8
Department of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou, China.
9
Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, USA.
10
Department of Sociology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.
11
Eastern Virginia Medical University, Norfolk, USA.
12
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
13
Guangdong Provincial Centre for Skin Diseases and STI Control, Number 2 Lujing Road, Guangzhou, China.
14
University of North Carolina Project-China, Guangzhou, China. jdtucker@med.unc.edu.
15
Social Entrepreneurship to Spur Health (SESH), Guangzhou, China. jdtucker@med.unc.edu.
16
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA. jdtucker@med.unc.edu.
17
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. jdtucker@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

Men who have sex with men (MSM) disclose same-sex behaviors with others, creating disclosure networks. This study examined the characteristics of disclosure networks that are associated with HIV testing among MSM in China through an online nationwide survey. Name-generator questions were used to ask each participant ("ego") to nominate up to five social network members ("alters") with whom he had disclosed same-sex behaviors. Among the 806 men, the average disclosure network size was 4.05. MSM who reported larger disclosure networks were more likely to have been tested for HIV (aOR 1.21, 95% CI 1.08-1.34). The most common disclosure network alters were friends (45.1%), followed by sex partners (18.7%) and healthcare professionals (2.5%). Men who disclosed to healthcare professionals were more likely to test for HIV compared to men who disclosed to family members (aOR 5.43, 95% CI 2.11-14.04). Our findings can inform disclosure network-based interventions to promote MSM HIV testing.

KEYWORDS:

China; Ego; HIV; MSM; Network

PMID:
30680538
PMCID:
PMC6511288
[Available on 2020-05-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-019-02404-z

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