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Biol Psychol. 2019 Feb;141:10-16. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.014. Epub 2018 Dec 29.

Frontal alpha asymmetry moderates the relations between behavioral inhibition and social-effect ERN.

Author information

1
Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, 3304 Benjamin Building, College Park, MD, 20742-1131, USA; Emotion and Development Branch, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. Electronic address: anitaharrewijn@gmail.com.
2
Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, 3304 Benjamin Building, College Park, MD, 20742-1131, USA.
3
Emotion and Development Branch, National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA.

Abstract

Behavioral inhibition (BI) is an early temperamental precursor of anxiety disorders, characterized by withdrawal from novel situations. Some but not all young children with BI go on to display anxiety disorders. Neural correlates, such as frontal alpha asymmetry or event-related negativity (ERN), could moderate the relations between early BI and later anxiety. The goal of this longitudinal study was to test frontal alpha asymmetry as a potential moderator of the relation between BI and later anxiety, and of the relation between BI and the social-effect ERN. 100 children were assessed for BI at ages 2 and 3, and we collected EEG during resting state and the social Flanker task at age 12. Frontal alpha asymmetry did not correlate with BI or anxiety, nor did it moderate the relation between early BI and later anxiety. However, frontal alpha asymmetry did moderate the relation between BI and the social-effect ERN. This suggests that, in adolescents who previously manifested BI, a pattern of resting EEG associated with avoidance predicts hypersensitivity to errors in a social context.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral inhibition; EEG; Error-related negativity; Frontal alpha asymmetry

PMID:
30599209
PMCID:
PMC6471600
[Available on 2020-02-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.12.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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