Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Appl Clin Inform. 2018 Oct;9(4):892-904. doi: 10.1055/s-0038-1676087. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

Sharing of ADHD Information between Parents and Teachers Using an EHR-Linked Application.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
2
Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
3
Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
4
PolicyLab: Center to Bridge Research, Practice, and Policy, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
5
Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
6
Division of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
7
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.
8
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Appropriate management of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) involves parents, clinicians, and teachers. Fragmentation of interventions between different settings can lead to suboptimal care and outcomes. Electronic systems can bridge gaps across settings. Our institution developed an email-based software to collect ADHD information from parents and teachers, which delivered data directly to the clinician within the electronic health record (EHR).

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to adapt our institution's existing EHR-linked system for ADHD symptom monitoring to support communication between parents and teachers and then to assess child characteristics associated with sharing of ADHD information.

METHODS:

We updated our software to support automated sharing of ADHD information between parents and teachers. Sharing was optional for parents but obligatory for teachers. We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving 590 patients at 31 primary care sites to evaluate a system for sharing of ADHD-specific health information between parents and teachers. We used multivariable logistic regression to estimate associations between child characteristics and parental sharing. We further investigated the association between child characteristics and viewing of survey results delivered through the electronic communication system.

RESULTS:

Most parents (64%) elected to share survey results with teachers at the first opportunity and the vast majority (80%) elected to share all possible information. Parents who elected to share usually continue sharing at subsequent opportunities (89%). Younger child age and performance impairments were associated with increased likelihood of sharing. However, parents viewed only 16% of teacher submitted surveys and teachers only viewed 30% of surveys shared by parents.

CONCLUSION:

This study demonstrates that electronic systems to capture ADHD information from parents and teachers can be adapted to support communication between them, and that parents are amenable to sharing ADHD information with teachers. However, strategies are needed to encourage viewing of shared information.

PMID:
30566963
PMCID:
PMC6300414
DOI:
10.1055/s-0038-1676087
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Dr. Michel, Dr. Grundmeier, and Mr. Miller are the primary authors of the ADHD Care Assistant, which was used to implement portions of the intervention evaluated in this article. No patent or licensing agreement exists for this technology and the invention has generated no revenue. The remaining authors have no conflicts of interest relevant to this article to disclose.Drs. Grundmeier and Fiks are coinventors of the Care Assistant framework, which was used to implement portions of the intervention evaluated in this article. No patent or licensing agreement exists for this technology and the invention has generated no revenue. The remaining authors have no financial relationships relevant to this article to disclose. Though he personally took no salary support, Dr. Fiks's research team received grant support from Pfizer for an independent research project to improve ADHD care.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center