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J Antimicrob Chemother. 2018 Dec 4. doi: 10.1093/jac/dky492. [Epub ahead of print]

Emergence and rapid global dissemination of CTX-M-15-associated Klebsiella pneumoniae strain ST307.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
2
Department of Medical Microbiology, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
3
Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
4
The ithree Institute, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, NSW, Australia.
5
Microbiological Diagnostic Unit Public Health Laboratory, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne at The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
6
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Abstract

Objectives:

Recent reports indicate the emergence of a new carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae clone, ST307. We sought to better understand the global epidemiology and evolution of this clone and evaluate its association with antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes.

Methods:

We collated information from the literature and public databases and performed a comparative analysis of 95 ST307 genomes (including 37 that were newly sequenced).

Results:

We show that ST307 emerged in the mid-1990s (nearly 20 years prior to its first report), is already globally distributed and is intimately associated with a conserved plasmid harbouring the blaCTX-M-15 ESBL gene and several other AMR determinants.

Conclusions:

Our findings support the need for enhanced surveillance of this widespread ESBL clone in which carbapenem resistance has occasionally emerged.

PMID:
30517666
DOI:
10.1093/jac/dky492

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