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BMC Microbiol. 2018 Nov 13;18(1):184. doi: 10.1186/s12866-018-1326-1.

Gut microbiota of preterm infants supplemented with probiotics: sub-study of the ProPrems trial.

Author information

1
The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia. erica.plummer@mcri.edu.au.
2
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia. erica.plummer@mcri.edu.au.
3
Infection and Immunity Program, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC, 3800, Australia.
4
The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3050, Australia.
5
Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative, The University of Melbourne, Parkville Campus, LAB-14, 700 Swanston St, Carlton, VIC, 3053, Australia.
6
The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia.
7
Murdoch Children's Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia.
8
The Royal Children's Hospital, 50 Flemington Rd, Parkville, VIC, 3052, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ProPrems trial, a multi-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial, previously reported a 54% reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) of Bell stage 2 or more from 4.4 to 2.0% in 1099 infants born before 32 completed weeks' gestation and weighing < 1500 g, receiving probiotic supplementation (with Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis BB-02, Streptococcus thermophilus TH-4 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12). This sub-study investigated the effect of probiotic supplementation on the gut microbiota in a cohort of very preterm infants in ProPrems.

RESULTS:

Bifidobacterium was found in higher abundance in infants who received the probiotics (AOR 17.22; 95% CI, 3.49-84.99, p < 0.001) as compared to the placebo group, and Enterococcus was reduced in infants receiving the probiotic during the supplementation period (AOR 0.27; 95% CI, 0.09-0.82, p = 0.02).

CONCLUSION:

Probiotic supplementation with BB-02, TH-4 and BB-12 from soon after birth increased the abundance of Bifidobacterium in the gut microbiota of very preterm infants. Increased abundance of Bifidobacterium soon after birth may be associated with reducing the risk of NEC in very preterm infants.

KEYWORDS:

Gut microbiota; Necrotizing enterocolitis; Probiotics; Very preterm infants

PMID:
30424728
PMCID:
PMC6234596
DOI:
10.1186/s12866-018-1326-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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