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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2018 Oct 19;95:336-346. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2018.10.008. [Epub ahead of print]

Using rodents to model abnormal sensitivity to feedback in depression.

Author information

1
Institute of Pharmacology Polish Academy of Sciences, Department of Pharmacology, Affective Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Ul. Smetna 12, 31-343, Krakow, Poland. Electronic address: rygula@gmail.com.
2
Institute of Pharmacology Polish Academy of Sciences, Department of Pharmacology, Affective Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Ul. Smetna 12, 31-343, Krakow, Poland.

Abstract

Depressive disorder accounts for a substantial proportion of psychiatric problems across the globe and has a devastating impact on quality of life and occupational function. Psychological models of depression emphasize the causal role of cognitive distortions in this disease, and cognitive problems have been included in the diagnostic criteria for depressive episodes. Here, we focus on recent progress in preclinical modelling of aberrations in one of the most important neurocognitive mechanisms involved in the manifestation of depression - abnormal sensitivity to positive and negative feedback. First, we summarize the recent advances in understanding neurocognitive mechanisms of aberrant feedback sensitivity in depression and underlying neurobiological substrates. Second, by combining behavioural, neurochemical, neuroanatomical and pharmacological approaches, we evaluate the translational value of the probabilistic reversal-learning (PRL) task, a behavioural paradigm that enables investigation of correlates of feedback sensitivity in humans and animals. Finally, we identify and discuss directions for future investigation, including cognitive biomarkers of depression and resilience to stress based on feedback sensitivity and personalized treatment targets.

KEYWORDS:

Affective; Cognition; Depression; Feedback; Probabilistic reversal learning; Rat

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