Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2018 Oct 15;8(1):15237. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-33567-9.

Brain regions modulated during covert visual attention in the macaque.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA. bogadhi.amar@gmail.com.
2
Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA.
3
Laboratory of Neuropsychology, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA.
4
Neurophysiology Imaging Facility, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA.
5
Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA. richard.krauzlis@nih.gov.

Abstract

Neurophysiological studies of covert visual attention in monkeys have emphasized the modulation of sensory neural responses in the visual cortex. At the same time, electrophysiological correlates of attention have been reported in other cortical and subcortical structures, and recent fMRI studies have identified regions across the brain modulated by attention. Here we used fMRI in two monkeys performing covert attention tasks to reproduce and extend these findings in order to help establish a more complete list of brain structures involved in the control of attention. As expected from previous studies, we found attention-related modulation in frontal, parietal and visual cortical areas as well as the superior colliculus and pulvinar. We also found significant attention-related modulation in cortical regions not traditionally linked to attention - mid-STS areas (anterior FST and parts of IPa, PGa, TPO), as well as the caudate nucleus. A control experiment using a second-order orientation stimulus showed that the observed modulation in a subset of these mid-STS areas did not depend on visual motion. These results identify the mid-STS areas (anterior FST and parts of IPa, PGa, TPO) and caudate nucleus as potentially important brain regions in the control of covert visual attention in monkeys.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center