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Nat Commun. 2018 Oct 9;9(1):4169. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-06473-x.

Meta-analysis of effects of exclusive breastfeeding on infant gut microbiota across populations.

Author information

1
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York City, NY, 10032, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.
3
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
4
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115, USA.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, T6G 1C9, AB, Canada.
6
HKU-Pasteur Research Pole, School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China.
7
Duke University, Durham, NC, 27708, USA.
8
University of Cape Town Health Sciences Faculty, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Cape Town, 7701, South Africa.
9
Seattle Children's Research Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98101, USA.
10
Children's Hospital Los Angeles, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90027, USA.
11
Children's Hospital Research Institute of Manitoba, Department of Pediatrics & Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3E 3P4, Manitoba, Canada.
12
Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
13
Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
14
Microbiome Core Facility, Center for Gastrointestinal Biology and Disease, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.
15
Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA.
16
Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York City, NY, 10032, USA. lk24@columbia.edu.

Abstract

Previous studies on the differences in gut microbiota between exclusively breastfed (EBF) and non-EBF infants have provided highly variable results. Here we perform a meta-analysis of seven microbiome studies (1825 stool samples from 684 infants) to compare the gut microbiota of non-EBF and EBF infants across populations. In the first 6 months of life, gut bacterial diversity, microbiota age, relative abundances of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and predicted microbial pathways related to carbohydrate metabolism are consistently higher in non-EBF than in EBF infants, whereas relative abundances of pathways related to lipid metabolism, vitamin metabolism, and detoxification are lower. Variation in predicted microbial pathways associated with non-EBF infants is larger among infants born by Caesarian section than among those vaginally delivered. Longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced diarrhea-related gut microbiota dysbiosis. Furthermore, differences in gut microbiota between EBF and non-EBF infants persist after 6 months of age. Our findings elucidate some mechanisms of short and long-term benefits of exclusive breastfeeding across different populations.

PMID:
30301893
PMCID:
PMC6177445
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-06473-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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