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Cell Metab. 2018 Oct 2;28(4):543-546. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2018.09.007. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

Methodological Issues in Studying PAHSA Biology: Masking PAHSA Effects.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
2
Department of Genetics, Evolution, Microbiology, and Immunology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas-SP 13083-970, Brazil.
3
The Lundberg Laboratory for Diabetes Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden.
4
Department of Biochemistry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA.
5
Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology, Helmsley Center for Genomic Medicine, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, 10010 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: asaghatelian@salk.edu.
6
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA. Electronic address: bkahn@bidmc.harvard.edu.

Abstract

PAHSAs are anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory lipids. Syed et al. identify numerous experimental differences that likely account for the failure of Pflimlin et al. to observe PAHSA beneficial effects. The differences include different HFDs resulting in minimal/no glucose intolerance, different assay conditions, an LC-MS protocol that was not validated, and use of olive oil, a bioactive nutrient that improves glucose tolerance, as a vehicle.

PMID:
30244974
PMCID:
PMC6542592
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2018.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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