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Brain Struct Funct. 2018 Nov;223(8):3801-3812. doi: 10.1007/s00429-018-1722-1. Epub 2018 Aug 4.

Distributed cortical structural properties contribute to motor cortical excitability and inhibition.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Biomedical Research Imaging Center and Neuroscience Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. eran_dayan@med.unc.edu.
2
Human Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. eran_dayan@med.unc.edu.
3
Department of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, "Center of Higher Education Alberta Giménez (CESAG)" Comillas Pontifical University, Palma, Spain.
4
Department of Physical Education, Faculty of Sciences of Sport and Physical Education, University of A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain.
5
Human Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
6
Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
7
Divisions of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
8
Human Cortical Physiology and Neurorehabilitation Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. cohenl@ninds.nih.gov.

Abstract

The link between the local structure of the primary motor cortex and motor function has been well documented. However, motor function relies on a network of interconnected brain regions and the link between the structural properties characterizing these distributed brain networks and motor function remains poorly understood. Here, we examined whether distributed patterns of brain structure, extending beyond the primary motor cortex can help classify two forms of motor function: corticospinal excitability and intracortical inhibition. To this effect, we recorded high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging scans in 25 healthy volunteers. To measure corticospinal excitability and inhibition in the same volunteers, we recorded motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) in a separate session. Support vector machine (SVM) pattern classification was used to identify distributed multi-voxel gray-matter areas, which distinguished subjects who had lower and higher MEPs and SICIs. We found that MEP and SICI classification could be predicted based on a widely distributed, largely non-overlapping pattern of voxels in frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital, and cerebellar regions. Thus, structural properties distributed over the brain beyond the primary motor cortex relate to motor function.

KEYWORDS:

Cortical excitability; Cortical inhibition; MRI; TMS

PMID:
30078148
DOI:
10.1007/s00429-018-1722-1

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