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Elife. 2018 Jun 14;7. pii: e35518. doi: 10.7554/eLife.35518.

Tenectin recruits integrin to stabilize bouton architecture and regulate vesicle release at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

Author information

1
Section on Cellular Communication, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States.
2
Section on Intracellular Protein Trafficking, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States.

Abstract

Assembly, maintenance and function of synaptic junctions depend on extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and their receptors. Here we report that Tenectin (Tnc), a Mucin-type protein with RGD motifs, is an ECM component required for the structural and functional integrity of synaptic specializations at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Drosophila. Using genetics, biochemistry, electrophysiology, histology and electron microscopy, we show that Tnc is secreted from motor neurons and striated muscles and accumulates in the synaptic cleft. Tnc selectively recruits αPS2/βPS integrin at synaptic terminals, but only the cis Tnc/integrin complexes appear to be biologically active. These complexes have distinct pre- and postsynaptic functions, mediated at least in part through the local engagement of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton: the presynaptic complexes control neurotransmitter release, while postsynaptic complexes ensure the size and architectural integrity of synaptic boutons. Our study reveals an unprecedented role for integrin in the synaptic recruitment of spectrin-based membrane skeleton.

KEYWORDS:

D. melanogaster; cell biology; extracellular matrix; integrin; neuromuscular junction; neuroscience; synaptic terminals

PMID:
29901439
PMCID:
PMC6040883
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.35518
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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