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PLoS One. 2018 Jun 5;13(6):e0197665. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197665. eCollection 2018.

Cancer risk in HIV patients with incomplete viral suppression after initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
2
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
3
Center for AIDS Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
4
Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Center for Global Health, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.
5
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.
6
Division of Epidemiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States of America.
7
University of California, San Diego, California, United States of America.
8
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
9
Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cancer causes significant morbidity and mortality among HIV patients in the US due to extended life expectancy with access to effective antiretroviral therapy. Low, detectable HIV RNA has been studied as a risk factor for adverse health outcomes, but its clinical impact on cancer risk remains unclear. The objective of this study was to determine whether HIV RNA <1,000 copies/mL six months after starting therapy was associated with 10-year first cancer risk.

METHODS:

We followed 7,515 HIV therapy initiators from a US-based multicenter clinical cohort from 1998 to 2014. We used nonparametric multiple imputation to account for viral loads that fell below assay detection limits, and categorized viral loads six months after therapy initiation into four groups: <20, 20-199, 200-999, and >999 copies/mL. We calculated estimates of the cumulative incidence of cancer diagnosis, accounting for death as a competing event. Inverse probability of exposure and censoring weights were used to control for confounding and differential loss to follow up, respectively.

RESULTS:

Crude 10-year first cancer risk in the study sample was 7.03% (95% CI: 6.08%, 7.98%), with the highest risk observed among patients with viral loads between 200 and 999 copies/mL six months after ART initiation (10.7%). After controlling for baseline confounders, 10-year first cancer risk was 6.90% (95% CI: 5.69%, 8.12%), and was similar across viral load categories.

CONCLUSION:

Overall risk of first cancer was not associated with incomplete viral suppression; however, cancer remains a significant threat to HIV patients after treatment initiation. As more HIV patients gain access to treatment in the current "treat all" era, occurrences of incomplete viral suppression will be observed more frequently in clinical practice, which supports continued study of the role of low-level HIV RNA on cancer development.

PMID:
29870537
PMCID:
PMC5988275
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0197665
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

The authors of this manuscript have the following competing interests: Dr. Althoff serves on the scientific advisory board for TrioHealth and previously served on a scientific advisory board for Gilead Sciences, Inc. Dr. Moore is a consultant to Medscape. Dr. Eron is a consultant to ViiV Healthcare, Gilead Sciences, Merck, and Janssen; he was previously a consultant to Bristol-Myers Squibb. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill receives research contracts from ViiV Healthcare, Gilead Science, and Janssen, on which Dr. Eron is an investigator. The remaining authors have declared that no competing interests exist. This does not alter our adherence to PLOS ONE policies on sharing data and materials, though we note restrictions to data access.

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