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Genome Biol. 2018 Jun 4;19(1):72. doi: 10.1186/s13059-018-1444-y.

A major locus controls local adaptation and adaptive life history variation in a perennial plant.

Author information

1
Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden. jingwang368@gmail.com.
2
Centre for Integrative Genetics, Department of Animal and Aquacultural Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, PO Box 5003, Ås, Norway. jingwang368@gmail.com.
3
Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, 901 83, Umeå, Sweden.
4
Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden.
5
Stora Enso Biomaterials, 13104, Nacka, Sweden.
6
Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Plant Physiology, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden.
7
Wallenberg Advanced Bioinformatics Infrastructure, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
8
Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
9
Uppsala Multidisciplinary Center for Advanced Computational Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
10
Umeå Plant Science Centre, Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Umeå University, 90187, Umeå, Sweden. par.ingvarsson@slu.se.
11
Present address: Department of Plant Biology, Uppsala BioCenter, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 7080, 750 07, Uppsala, Sweden. par.ingvarsson@slu.se.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The initiation of growth cessation and dormancy represent critical life-history trade-offs between survival and growth and have important fitness effects in perennial plants. Such adaptive life-history traits often show strong local adaptation along environmental gradients but, despite their importance, the genetic architecture of these traits remains poorly understood.

RESULTS:

We integrate whole genome re-sequencing with environmental and phenotypic data from common garden experiments to investigate the genomic basis of local adaptation across a latitudinal gradient in European aspen (Populus tremula). A single genomic region containing the PtFT2 gene mediates local adaptation in the timing of bud set and explains 65% of the observed genetic variation in bud set. This locus is the likely target of a recent selective sweep that originated right before or during colonization of northern Scandinavia following the last glaciation. Field and greenhouse experiments confirm that variation in PtFT2 gene expression affects the phenotypic variation in bud set that we observe in wild natural populations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results reveal a major effect locus that determines the timing of bud set and that has facilitated rapid adaptation to shorter growing seasons and colder climates in European aspen. The discovery of a single locus explaining a substantial fraction of the variation in a key life-history trait is remarkable, given that such traits are generally considered to be highly polygenic. These findings provide a dramatic illustration of how loci of large-effect for adaptive traits can arise and be maintained over large geographical scales in natural populations.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptive traits; Genomic basis; Local adaptation; Populus tremula; PtFT2; Selective sweep

PMID:
29866176
PMCID:
PMC5985590
DOI:
10.1186/s13059-018-1444-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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