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Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 Aug;37(8):788-793. doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000001901.

Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Among HIV-infected Children and Adolescents Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in the TREAT Asia Pediatric HIV Observational Database.

Author information

1
From the Research Institute for Health Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
2
The Kirby Institute, UNSW Australia, Sydney, Australia.
3
University of Health Sciences and National Pediatric Hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
4
Hospital Likas, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia.
5
Worldwide Orphans Foundation, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
6
Chiangrai Prachanukroh Hospital, Chiang Rai, Thailand.
7
HIV-NAT, The Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre, Bangkok, Thailand.
8
Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
10
YRGCARE Medical Centre, CART CRS, Chennai, India.
11
Sanglah Hospital, Udayana University, Bali, Indonesia.
12
Hospital Raja Perempuan Zainab II, Kelantan, Malaysia.
13
Pediatric Institute, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
14
Penang Hospital, Penang, Malaysia.
15
TREAT Asia/amfAR - The Foundation for AIDS Research, Bangkok, Thailand.
16
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Hepatitis B (HBV)-HIV coinfection is associated with liver inflammation, which can progress to liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We determined HBV seroprevalence in children and adolescents participating in the TREAT Asia Pediatric HIV Observational Database.

METHODS:

A multisite cross-sectional study was conducted in HIV-infected patients currently <25 years old receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) who had HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), or HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs) or HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) tested during 2012-2013. HBV coinfection was defined as having either a positive HBsAg test or being anti-HBc positive and anti-HBs negative, reflective of past HBV infection. HBV seroprotection was defined as having a positive anti-HBs test.

RESULTS:

A total of 3380 patients from 6 countries (Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Malaysia, Indonesia and India) were included. The current median (interquartile range) age was 11.2 (7.8-15.1) years. Of the 2755 patients (81.5%) with HBsAg testing, 130 (4.7%) were positive. Of 1558 (46%) with anti-HBc testing, 77 (4.9%) were positive. Thirteen of 1037 patients with all 3 tests were anti-HBc positive and HBsAg and anti-HBs negative. One child was positive for anti-HBc and negative for anti-HBs but did not have HBsAg tested. The prevalence of HBV coinfection was 144/2759 (5.2%) (95% confidence interval: 4.4-6.1). Of 1093 patients (32%) with anti-HBs testing, 257 (23.5%; confidence interval: 21.0-26.0) had positive tests representing HBV seroprotection.

CONCLUSIONS:

The estimated prevalence of HBV coinfection in this cohort of Asian HIV-infected children and adolescents on ART was 5.2%. The majority of children and adolescents tested in this cohort (76.5%) did not have protective HBV antibody. The finding supports HBV screening of HIV-infected children and adolescents to guide revaccination, the use of ART with anti-HBV activity and future monitoring.

PMID:
29846357
PMCID:
PMC6097529
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.1097/INF.0000000000001901

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