Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Adv Exp Med Biol. 2018;1074:429-435. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-75402-4_53.

The Role of Microbiota in Retinal Disease.

Rowan S1,2, Taylor A3,4,5.

Author information

1
USDA-JM Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA), Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA. sheldon.rowan@tufts.edu.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA. sheldon.rowan@tufts.edu.
3
USDA-JM Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (HNRCA), Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

The ten years since the first publications on the human microbiome project have brought enormous attention and insight into the role of the human microbiome in health and disease. Connections between populations of microbiota and ocular disease are now being established, and increased accessibility to microbiome research and insights into other diseases is expected to yield enormous information in the coming years. With the characterization of the ocular microbiome, important insights have already been made regarding corneal and conjunctival tissues. Roles for non-ocular microbiomes in complex retinal diseases are now being evaluated. For example, the gut microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of uveitis. This short review will summarize the few studies linking gut or oral microbiota to diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We will also conjecture where the most significant findings still remain to be elucidated. Finally, we will propose the gut-retina axis, related but distinct from the gut-brain axis.

KEYWORDS:

Age-related macular degeneration; Diabetic retinopathy; Glaucoma; Glycemic index; Gut dysbiosis; Gut microbiome; Gut-retina axis; Microbiota; Oral microbiome; Uveitis

PMID:
29721973
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-75402-4_53
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center