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Res Social Adm Pharm. 2018 Apr 10. pii: S1551-7411(17)30858-6. doi: 10.1016/j.sapharm.2018.04.008. [Epub ahead of print]

Pharmacists in humanitarian crisis settings: Assessing the impact of pharmacist-delivered home medication management review service to Syrian refugees in Jordan.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan. Electronic address: majdoleen33@yahoo.com.
2
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan. Electronic address: nabeel_nuaimi@yahoo.com.
3
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan; Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: dr_iman@asu.edu.jo.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Refugees all over the world are facing several health-related problems. Chronic diseases among Syrian refugees in Jordan are high. The Home Medication Management Review (HMMR) service could be ideal to optimize refugees' health management.

OBJECTIVES:

To assess the impact of the HMMR service on the type and frequency of Treatment Related Problems (TRPs) among Syrian refugees living in Jordan.

METHODS:

This prospective randomized single blinded intervention-control study was conducted in three main cities in Jordan, between May and October 2016. Syrian refugees with chronic conditions were recruited and randomized into intervention and control groups. The HMMR service was conducted for all patients to identify TRPs at baseline. Data were collected via two home visits for all study participants. Clinical pharmacist's recommendations were written in a letter format to the physicians managing the patients in the intervention group only. Physicians' approved recommendations were conveyed to the patients via the pharmacist. Interventions at the patient level were delivered by the pharmacist directly. Patients were reassessed for their TRPs and satisfaction 3 months after baseline.

RESULTS:

Syrian refugees (n = 106) were recruited with no significant differences between the intervention (n = 53) and control groups (n = 53). A total of 1141 TRPs were identified for both groups at baseline, with a mean number of 10.8 ± 4.2 TRPs per patient. At follow-up, there was a significant decrease in the number of TRPs among the intervention group (P < 0.001, paired sample t-test) but not among the control group (P = 0.116). Physicians' approval rate of the pharmacist's recommendations was high (82.9%), and more than 70.0% of refugees in the intervention group reported high satisfaction with the HMMR service.

CONCLUSION:

Identified TRPs are high amongst Syrian refugees living in Jordan. The HMMR service significantly reduced the number of TRPs, and was highly accepted by the physicians. Refugees reported high satisfaction with this service.

KEYWORDS:

Home medication management review; Home visits; Pharmaceutical care; Syrian refugees; Treatment related problem

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