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Neurobiol Aging. 2018 Aug;68:160.e9-160.e14. doi: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.03.008. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

Genome-wide association identifies a novel locus for delirium risk.

Author information

1
Center for Quantitative Health, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: thmccoy@partners.org.
2
Center for Quantitative Health, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

We aimed to identify common genetic variations associated with delirium through genome-wide association testing in a hospital biobank. We applied a published electronic health record-based definition of delirium to identify cases of delirium, and control individuals with no history of delirium, from a biobank spanning 2 Boston academic medical centers. Among 6035 individuals of northern European ancestry, including 421 with a history of delirium, we used logistic regression to examine genome-wide association. We identified one locus spanning multiple genes, including 3 interleukin-related genes, associated with p = 1.41e-8, and 5 other independent loci with p < 5e-7. Our results do not support previously reported candidate gene associations in delirium. Identifying common-variant associations with delirium may provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for this complex and multifactorial outcome. Using standardized claims-based phenotypes in biobanks should allow the larger scale investigations required to confirm novel loci such as the one we identify.

KEYWORDS:

Attention; Biobank; Consultation psychiatry; Delirium; Genetic association

PMID:
29631748
PMCID:
PMC5993590
[Available on 2019-08-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.03.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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