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Ecol Lett. 2018 May;21(5):724-733. doi: 10.1111/ele.12940. Epub 2018 Mar 25.

Drivers of vegetative dormancy across herbaceous perennial plant species.

Author information

1
Organization for Programs in Environmental Sciences, University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Estonian University of Life Sciences, Tartu, Estonia.
3
School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, Sussex, BN1 9QG, UK.
4
Institut Systématique Evolution Biodiversité (ISYEB), Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, EPHE, 57 rue Cuvier, CP39, 75005, Paris, France.
5
Department of Plant Taxonomy and Nature Conservation, University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland.
6
Department of Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
7
Odum School of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.
8
Archbold Biological Station, Venus, FL, USA.
9
Biology Department, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA.
10
Department of Biology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
11
Department of Ecology and Genetics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
12
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA.
13
Department of Natural Resources, St. Paul, MN, USA.
14
Research Institute for Nature and Forest, Brussels, Belgium.
15
Institute of Biology, University of Bialystok, Bialystok, Poland.
16
Daskabát, Olomouc, Czech Republic.
17
Department of Biology, West Virginia Wesleyan College, Buckhannon, West Virginia, USA.
18
Department of Biology of Ecosystems, Faculty of Science, University of South Bohemia, České Budějovice, Czech Republic.
19
Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA.
20
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD, USA.
21
Instituto de Ecologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitario, UNAM, Mexico City, Mexico.
22
LGL Limited, Sidney, BC, Canada.
23
Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway.
24
Laboratoire Evolution et Diversité Biologique, Université Paul Sabatier - CNRS, Toulouse, France.
25
Department of Ecology and Genetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
26
Global Change Research Institute, Czech Academy of Science, Brno, Czech Republic.
27
Department of Biology, SUNY Buffalo State, Buffalo, NY, USA.

Abstract

Vegetative dormancy, that is the temporary absence of aboveground growth for ≥ 1 year, is paradoxical, because plants cannot photosynthesise or flower during dormant periods. We test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses for its widespread persistence. We show that dormancy has evolved numerous times. Most species displaying dormancy exhibit life-history costs of sprouting, and of dormancy. Short-lived and mycoheterotrophic species have higher proportions of dormant plants than long-lived species and species with other nutritional modes. Foliage loss is associated with higher future dormancy levels, suggesting that carbon limitation promotes dormancy. Maximum dormancy duration is shorter under higher precipitation and at higher latitudes, the latter suggesting an important role for competition or herbivory. Study length affects estimates of some demographic parameters. Our results identify life historical and environmental drivers of dormancy. We also highlight the evolutionary importance of the little understood costs of sprouting and growth, latitudinal stress gradients and mixed nutritional modes.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptation; Asteraceae; Ophioglossaceae; Orchidaceae; bet-hedging; demography; herbivory; latitudinal gradient; stress

PMID:
29575384
DOI:
10.1111/ele.12940

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