Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Infect Dis. 2018 Jun 20;218(2):234-238. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiy011.

Cumulative Antiretroviral Exposure Measured in Hair Is Not Associated With Measures of HIV Persistence or Inflammation Among Individuals on Suppressive ART.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco.
2
Department of Medicine and Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.
3
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA.
5
Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
6
Social and Scientific Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.
7
Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Inc., Amherst, NY.
8
College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha.

Abstract

Data on the relationship of antiretroviral exposure to measures of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence are limited. To address this gap, multiple viral, immunologic, and pharmacologic measures were analyzed from individuals with sustained virologic suppression on therapy (median 7 years) in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5321 cohort. Among 110 participants on tenofovir-(TFV)-disoproxil-fumarate (TDF)/emtricitabine (FTC)-containing regimens, we found no significant correlation between hair concentrations of individual antiretrovirals (ARVs) in the regimen and measures of HIV persistence (plasma HIV-1 RNA by single copy assay, cell-associated-DNA, cell-associated RNA) or soluble markers of inflammation. These findings suggest that higher systemic ARV exposure may not impact HIV persistence or inflammation.

PMID:
29529230
PMCID:
PMC6009579
[Available on 2019-06-20]
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiy011

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center