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AIDS Behav. 2018 Dec;22(12):3826-3835. doi: 10.1007/s10461-018-2062-0.

Receiving HIV Serostatus Disclosure from Partners Before Sex: Results from an Online Survey of Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men.

Tang W1,2,3,4, Liu C5,6,7, Cao B5,6,8, Pan SW5,6, Zhang Y5,6,9, Ong J5, Fu H10, Ma B11, Fu R5,6, Yang B9, Ma W12, Wei C13, Tucker JD5,6,14; SESH Study Group.

Author information

1
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Project-China, Guangzhou, 510095, China. weimingtangscience@gmail.com.
2
SESH Study Group, Guangzhou, China. weimingtangscience@gmail.com.
3
Dermatology Hospital of Southern Medical University (Guangdong Dermatology Hospital), Guangzhou, China. weimingtangscience@gmail.com.
4
School of Medicine of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA. weimingtangscience@gmail.com.
5
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Project-China, Guangzhou, 510095, China.
6
SESH Study Group, Guangzhou, China.
7
Department of Sociology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.
8
College of Mass Communication, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, China.
9
Dermatology Hospital of Southern Medical University (Guangdong Dermatology Hospital), Guangzhou, China.
10
Division of Community Health and Research, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA.
11
Danlan Gongyi, Beijing, China.
12
School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
13
School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
14
School of Medicine of University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA.

Abstract

HIV serostatus disclosure before sex can facilitate serosorting, condom use and potentially decrease the risk of HIV acquisition. However, few studies have evaluated HIV serostatus disclosure from partners before sex. We examined the rate and correlates of receiving HIV serostatus disclosure from regular and casual male partners before sex among an online sample of men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. An online cross-sectional study was conducted among MSM in eight Chinese cities in July 2016. Participants completed questions covering sociodemographic information, sexual behaviors, HIV testing (including HIV self-testing) history, self-reported HIV status, and post-test violence. In addition, participants were asked whether they received HIV serostatus disclosure from their most recent partners before sex. Overall, 2105 men completed the survey. Among them, 85.9% were never married, and 35.4% had high school or less education. A minority (20.6%, 346/1678; 17.8%, 287/1608) of men received HIV serostatus disclosure from their most recent regular and casual male partners, respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that participants who ever self-tested for HIV were more likely to have received HIV status disclosure from regular [adjusted OR (aOR) = 1.92, 95% CI 1.50-2.44] and casual (aOR = 2.34, 95% CI 1.80-3.04) male partners compared to never self-tested participants. Compared to participants who had not received HIV status disclosure from regular partners, participants who received disclosure from regular male partners had higher likelihood in experiencing post-test violence (aOR = 5.18, 95% CI 1.53-17.58). Similar results were also found for receiving HIV serostatus disclosure from casual partners. This study showed that HIV serostatus disclosure from partners was uncommon among Chinese MSM. Interventions and further implementation research to facilitate safe disclosure are urgently needed for MSM.

KEYWORDS:

Disclosure; Male partner; Men who have sex with men; Self-testing; Violence

PMID:
29470809
PMCID:
PMC6105569
[Available on 2019-12-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-018-2062-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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