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BMC Ophthalmol. 2018 Jan 30;18(1):21. doi: 10.1186/s12886-018-0689-2.

Coping strategies, vision-related quality of life, and emotional health in managing retinitis pigmentosa: a survey study.

Anil K1,2, Garip G3,4.

Author information

1
University of Derby Online Learning, Derby, England, United Kingdom. k.anil@soton.ac.uk.
2
University of Derby, Kedleston Road, Derby, England, DE22 1GB, United Kingdom. k.anil@soton.ac.uk.
3
University of Derby Online Learning, Derby, England, United Kingdom.
4
University of Derby, Kedleston Road, Derby, England, DE22 1GB, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetic progressive retinal dystrophies that may adversely affect daily life. Those with RP should develop adaptive coping strategies to manage their condition. This study investigates the relationship between engaging (ECS) and disengaging coping strategies (DCS), vision-related quality of life (VRQoL), and emotional health, in adults living at home with retinitis pigmentosa.

METHOD:

One hundred and five participants (70 female; meanage of 46.98, SD age  = 13.77) completed a cross-sectional survey. The questionnaire booklet consisted of the Coping Strategies Inventory - Short Form (32 items), the National Eye Institute Visual Functioning Questionnaire 25 (25 items), Marylands Trait Depression Scale (18 items), the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (14 items), and the Subjective Happiness Scale (4 items).

RESULTS:

Data was analysed with a two-block hierarchical multiple regression, with the first block controlling for the demographic data (age, sex, years since retinitis pigmentosa diagnosis, number of comorbidities, participant-perceived retinitis pigmentosa severity, and knowing RP type) and the second block consisting of primary measures (type of coping strategy, VRQoL, and Emotional Health). Type of coping strategy was found to impact psychosocial variables of VRQoL, not overall VRQoL. These psychosocial VRQoL variables had a positive association with ECS and a negative association with DCS. Emotional Health increased with ECS and decreased with DCS. There was a larger impact of DCS on VRQoL and Emotional Health compared to ECS, that is, VRQoL and Emotional Health decreased more with increasing DCS than VRQoL, and Emotional Health increased with increasing ECS.

CONCLUSION:

In concordance with previous research, ECS increased with increasing VRQoL and DCS decreased with increasing VRQoL. However, the findings also indicated that DCS had a greater impact than ECS on VRQoL and Emotional Health. This suggests that diminishing DCS should be prioritised over developing ECS to positively influence VRQoL and Emotional Health. Further research should investigate the impact of reducing DCS compared to increasing ECS, and how this may influence VRQoL and Emotional Health.

KEYWORDS:

Coping; Emotion; Home; Retinitis pigmentosa; Vision-related quality of life

PMID:
29378559
PMCID:
PMC5789612
DOI:
10.1186/s12886-018-0689-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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