Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Behav Processes. 2018 Mar;148:16-19. doi: 10.1016/j.beproc.2017.12.010. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

The "olfactory mirror" and other recent attempts to demonstrate self-recognition in non-primate species.

Author information

1
University at Albany, Department of Psychology, 1200 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY, 12222, USA. Electronic address: gallup@albany.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto, 606-8501, Japan.

Abstract

The recent attempt by Horowitz (2017) to develop an "olfactory mirror" test of self-recognition in domestic dogs raises some important questions about the kinds of data that are required to provide definitive evidence for self-recognition in dogs and other species. We conclude that the "olfactory mirror" constitutes a compelling analog to the mark test for mirror self-recognition in primates, but despite claims to the contrary neither dogs, elephants, dolphins, magpies, horses, manta rays, squid, nor ants have shown compelling, reproducible evidence for self-recognition in any modality.

KEYWORDS:

Mirror self-recognition; Non-primate species; Olfactory self-recognition; Self-recognition in other modalities

PMID:
29274762
DOI:
10.1016/j.beproc.2017.12.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center