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Infection. 2018 Apr;46(2):207-214. doi: 10.1007/s15010-017-1097-x. Epub 2017 Dec 22.

The first report of Japanese antimicrobial use measured by national database based on health insurance claims data (2011-2013): comparison with sales data, and trend analysis stratified by antimicrobial category and age group.

Author information

1
Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie, 514-8507, Japan.
2
Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Mie University Hospital, 2-174 Edobashi, Tsu, Mie, 514-8507, Japan. m-tanabe@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp.
3
Department of Clinical Pharmacoepidemiology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan.
4
Solutions Center for Health Insurance Claims, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan.
5
Disease Control and Prevention Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Department of infectious Diseases, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Our objective was to evaluate the utility of the national database (NDB) based on health insurance claims data for antimicrobial use (AMU) surveillance in medical institutions in Japan.

METHODS:

The population-weighted total AMU expressed as defined daily doses (DDDs) per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID) was measured by the NDB. The data were compared with our previous study measured by the sales data. Trend analysis of DID from 2011 to 2013 and subgroup analysis stratified by antimicrobial category and age group were performed.

RESULTS:

There was a significant linear correlation between the AMUs measured by the sales data and the NDB. Total oral and parenteral AMUs (expressed in DID) were 1.04-fold from 12.654 in 2011 to 13.202 in 2013 and 1.13-fold from 0.734 to 0.829, respectively. Percentage of oral form among total AMU was high with more than 94% during the study period. AMU in the children group (0-14 years) decreased from 2011 to 2013 regardless of dosage form, although the working age group (15-64 years) and elderly group (65 and above years) increased. Oral AMU in the working age group was approximately two-thirds of those in the other age groups. In contrast, parenteral AMU in the elderly group was extremely high compared to the other age groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

The trend of AMU stratified by antimicrobial category and age group were successfully measured using the NDB, which can be a tool to monitor outcome indices for the national action plan on antimicrobial resistance.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial use; Japan; Monitoring; National database

PMID:
29273972
PMCID:
PMC5871632
DOI:
10.1007/s15010-017-1097-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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