Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Mol Immunol. 2019 Jun;110:40-47. doi: 10.1016/j.molimm.2017.12.002. Epub 2017 Dec 9.

Natural killer cells and anti-tumor immunity.

Author information

1
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, 3052, Australia; and Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia. Electronic address: snicholson@wehi.edu.au.
2
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, 3052, Australia; and Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia.
3
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, 3052, Australia; and Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Australia. Electronic address: belz@wehi.edu.au.

Abstract

Immune checkpoint inhibitors harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer. The clinical success achieved with antibodies against the inhibitory T cell receptors PD-1 and CTLA4 has focused attention on the possibility of manipulating other immune cells, in particular those involved in innate immunity. Here we review the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and their contribution to tumor immunity. As the prototypical ILC, the natural killer (NK) cell has an intrinsic ability to detect and kill cancer cells. NK cells are dependent on the cytokine interleukin (IL)-15 for their development and effector activity. We discuss the role of the Suppressor of cytokine (SOCS) proteins in negatively regulating IL-15 and NK cell responses and the potential for targeting these small intracellular regulators as new immune checkpoints.

KEYWORDS:

CIS; Cancer; IL-15; ILCs; NK cells; SOCS proteins; SOCS2

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center