Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Environ Health. 2017 Nov 17;16(1):124. doi: 10.1186/s12940-017-0336-z.

Prostate cancer in firefighting and police work: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies.

Author information

1
Occupational Cancer Research Centre, Cancer Care Ontario, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada. jeavana.sritharan@occupationalcancer.ca.
2
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada. jeavana.sritharan@occupationalcancer.ca.
3
Occupational Cancer Research Centre, Cancer Care Ontario, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada.
4
Occupational Cancer Research Centre, Cancer Care Ontario, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada. paul.demers@cancercare.on.ca.
5
Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada. paul.demers@cancercare.on.ca.
6
CAREX Canada, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada. paul.demers@cancercare.on.ca.
7
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada. paul.demers@cancercare.on.ca.
8
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada.
9
Population Health and Prevention, Cancer Care Ontario, 525 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L3, Canada.
10
INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, University of Quebec, 531 Boulevard des Prairies, Laval, Quebec, H7V 1B7, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate potential associations between firefighting and police occupations, and prostate cancer incidence and mortality.

METHODS:

Original epidemiological studies published from 1980 to 2017 were identified through PubMed and Web of Science. Studies were included if they contained specific job titles for ever/never firefighting and police work and associated prostate cancer risk estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Study quality was assessed using a 20-point checklist. Prostate cancer meta-risk estimates (mRE) and corresponding 95% CIs were calculated for firefighting and police work separately and by various study characteristics using random effects models. Between-study heterogeneity was evaluated using the I2 score. Publication bias was assessed using Begg's and Egger's tests.

RESULTS:

A total of 26 firefighter and 12 police studies were included in the meta-analysis, with quality assessment scores ranging from 7 to 19 points. For firefighter studies, the prostate cancer incidence mRE was 1.17 (95% CI = 1.08-1.28, I2 = 72%) and the mortality mRE was 1.12 (95% CI = 0.92-1.36, I2 = 50%). The mRE for police incidence studies was 1.14 (95% CI = 1.02-1.28; I2 = 33%); for mortality studies, the mRE was 1.08 (95% CI = 0.80-1.45; I2 = 0%). By study design, mREs for both firefighter and police studies were similar to estimates of incidence and mortality.

CONCLUSION:

Small excess risks of prostate cancer were observed from firefighter studies with moderate to substantial heterogeneity and a relatively small number of police studies, respectively. There is a need for further studies to examine police occupations and to assess unique and shared exposures in firefighting and police work.

KEYWORDS:

Epidemiology; Firefighters; Incidence; Meta-analysis; Mortality; Occupation; Police; Prostate cancer risk; Systematic review

PMID:
29149887
PMCID:
PMC5693511
DOI:
10.1186/s12940-017-0336-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center