Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurorehabil Neural Repair. 2017 Dec;31(12):1029-1041. doi: 10.1177/1545968317740634. Epub 2017 Nov 12.

Longitudinal Structural and Functional Differences Between Proportional and Poor Motor Recovery After Stroke.

Author information

1
1 Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland.
2
2 University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
3
3 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Evolution of motor function during the first months after stroke is stereotypically bifurcated, consisting of either recovery to about 70% of maximum possible improvement ("proportional recovery, PROP") or in little to no improvement ("poor recovery, POOR"). There is currently no evidence that any rehabilitation treatment will prevent POOR and favor PROP.

OBJECTIVE:

To perform a longitudinal and multimodal assessment of functional and structural changes in brain organization associated with PROP.

METHODS:

Fugl-Meyer Assessments of the upper extremity and high-density electroencephalography (EEG) were obtained from 63 patients, diffusion tensor imaging from 46 patients, at 2 and 4 weeks (T0) and at 3 months (T1) after stroke onset.

RESULTS:

We confirmed the presence of 2 distinct recovery patterns (PROP and POOR) in our sample. At T0, PROP patients had greater integrity of the corticospinal tract (CST) and greater EEG functional connectivity (FC) between the affected hemisphere and rest of the brain, in particular between the ventral premotor and the primary motor cortex. POOR patients suffered from degradation of corticocortical and corticofugal fiber tracts in the affected hemisphere between T0 and T1, which was not observed in PROP patients. Better initial CST integrity correlated with greater initial global FC, which was in turn associated with less white matter degradation between T0 and T1.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest links between initial CST integrity, systems-level cortical network plasticity, reduction of white matter atrophy, and clinical motor recovery after stroke. This identifies candidate treatment targets.

KEYWORDS:

diffusion tensor imaging; electroencephalography; motor function; plasticity; stroke

PMID:
29130824
DOI:
10.1177/1545968317740634
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center