Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Sci Rep. 2017 Nov 8;7(1):15043. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-14913-9.

Differential transcriptome regulation by 3,5-T2 and 3',3,5-T3 in brain and liver uncovers novel roles for thyroid hormones in tilapia.

Author information

1
Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro, Querétaro, 76230, Mexico.
2
Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida Genetics Institute, Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Sciences Neuroscience, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611, USA.
3
UMR 7221, Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Sorbone Universités, CP32, Rue Cuvier 57, Paris, 75005, France.
4
Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). Avenida Universidad 2001, Cuernavaca, Morelos, 62110, Mexico.
5
Instituto de Neurobiología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Querétaro, Querétaro, 76230, Mexico. aureao@unam.mx.

Abstract

Although 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) is considered to be the primary bioactive thyroid hormone (TH) due to its high affinity for TH nuclear receptors (TRs), new data suggest that 3,5-diiodothyronine (T2) can also regulate transcriptional networks. To determine the functional relevance of these bioactive THs, RNA-seq analysis was conducted in the cerebellum, thalamus-pituitary and liver of tilapia treated with equimolar doses of T2 or T3. We identified a total of 169, 154 and 2863 genes that were TH-responsive (FDR < 0.05) in the tilapia cerebellum, thalamus-pituitary and liver, respectively. Among these, 130, 96 and 349 genes were uniquely regulated by T3, whereas 22, 40 and 929 were exclusively regulated by T2 under our experimental paradigm. The expression profiles in response to TH treatment were tissue-specific, and the diversity of regulated genes also resulted in a variety of different pathways being affected by T2 and T3. T2 regulated gene networks associated with cell signalling and transcriptional pathways, while T3 regulated pathways related to cell signalling, the immune system, and lipid metabolism. Overall, the present work highlights the relevance of T2 as a key bioactive hormone, and reveals some of the different functional strategies that underpin TH pleiotropy.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center