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Sci Rep. 2017 Oct 31;7(1):14392. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-14613-4.

Graph theory reveals amygdala modules consistent with its anatomical subdivisions.

Author information

1
Neuroimaging Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. elisabeth.caparelli@nih.gov.
2
Neuroimaging Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
Research Center of Basic Space Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China.

Abstract

Similarities on the cellular and neurochemical composition of the amygdaloid subnuclei suggests their clustering into subunits that exhibit unique functional organization. The topological principle of community structure has been used to identify functional subnetworks in neuroimaging data that reflect the brain effective organization. Here we used modularity to investigate the organization of the amygdala using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data. Our goal was to determine whether such topological organization would reliably reflect the known neurobiology of individual amygdaloid nuclei, allowing for human imaging studies to accurately reflect the underlying neurobiology. Modularity analysis identified amygdaloid elements consistent with the main anatomical subdivisions of the amygdala that embody distinct functional and structural properties. Additionally, functional connectivity pathways of these subunits and their correlation with task-induced amygdala activation revealed distinct functional profiles consistent with the neurobiology of the amygdala nuclei. These modularity findings corroborate the structure-function relationship between amygdala anatomical substructures, supporting the use of network analysis techniques to generate biologically meaningful partitions of brain structures.

PMID:
29089582
PMCID:
PMC5663902
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-14613-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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