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Curr Top Behav Neurosci. 2018;38:23-46. doi: 10.1007/7854_2017_32.

MicroRNAs in Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, European Graduate School of Neuroscience, (EURON), Maastricht, 6200 MD, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
3
VA Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
4
VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
5
Laboratory of Translational Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, 97080, Germany.
6
Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, 3584 CG, The Netherlands.
7
Military Mental Health Research Center, Ministry of Defense, P.O. Box 90000, Utrecht, 3509 AA, The Netherlands.
8
Department of Psychiatry, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2333 ZA, The Netherlands.
9
Arq Psychotrauma Research Group, Diemen, 1112 XE, The Netherlands.
10
Laboratory of Genetics, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA, 92037, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, European Graduate School of Neuroscience, (EURON), Maastricht, 6200 MD, The Netherlands. b.rutten@maastrichtuniversity.nl.

Abstract

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder that can develop following exposure to or witnessing of a (potentially) threatening event. A critical issue is to pinpoint the (neuro)biological mechanisms underlying the susceptibility to stress-related disorder such as PTSD, which develops in the minority of ~15% of individuals exposed to trauma. Over the last few years, a first wave of epigenetic studies has been performed in an attempt to identify the molecular underpinnings of the long-lasting behavioral and mental effects of trauma exposure. The potential roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs) in moderating or mediating the impact of severe stress and trauma are increasingly gaining attention. To date, most studies focusing on the roles of miRNAs in PTSD have, however, been completed in animals, using cross-sectional study designs and focusing almost exclusively on subjects with susceptible phenotypes. Therefore, there is a strong need for new research comprising translational and cross-species approaches that use longitudinal designs for studying trajectories of change contrasting susceptible and resilient subjects. The present review offers a comprehensive overview of available studies of miRNAs in PTSD and discusses the current challenges, pitfalls, and future perspectives of this field.

KEYWORDS:

Brain; Epigenetics; Post-traumatic stress disorder; Review; microRNA

PMID:
29063484
DOI:
10.1007/7854_2017_32
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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