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Glia. 2018 Jun;66(6):1235-1243. doi: 10.1002/glia.23247. Epub 2017 Oct 17.

Epilepsy and astrocyte energy metabolism.

Author information

1
R.S. Dow Neurobiology Laboratories, Legacy Research Institute, Portland, Oregon.
2
Institute of Cellular Neurosciences, Medical Faculty, University of Bonn, Germany.

Abstract

Epilepsy is a complex neurological syndrome characterized by neuronal hyperexcitability and sudden, synchronized electrical discharges that can manifest as seizures. It is now increasingly recognized that impaired astrocyte function and energy homeostasis play key roles in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Excessive neuronal discharges can only happen, if adequate energy sources are made available to neurons. Conversely, energy depletion during seizures is an endogenous mechanism of seizure termination. Astrocytes control neuronal energy homeostasis through neurometabolic coupling. In this review, we will discuss how astrocyte dysfunction in epilepsy leads to distortion of key metabolic and biochemical mechanisms. Dysfunctional glutamate metabolism in astrocytes can directly contribute to neuronal hyperexcitability. Closure of astrocyte intercellular gap junction coupling as observed early during epileptogenesis limits activity-dependent trafficking of energy metabolites, but also impairs clearance of the extracellular space from accumulation of K+ and glutamate. Dysfunctional astrocytes also increase the metabolism of adenosine, a metabolic product of ATP degradation that broadly inhibits energy-consuming processes as an evolutionary adaptation to conserve energy. Due to the critical role of astroglial energy homeostasis in the control of neuronal excitability, metabolic therapeutic approaches that prevent the utilization of glucose might represent a potent antiepileptic strategy. In particular, high fat low carbohydrate "ketogenic diets" as well as inhibitors of glycolysis and lactate metabolism are of growing interest for the therapy of epilepsy.

KEYWORDS:

adenosine; gap junction coupling; ketogenic diet; lactate; neuron-glia interaction

PMID:
29044647
PMCID:
PMC5903956
[Available on 2019-06-01]
DOI:
10.1002/glia.23247
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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