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Epidemiol Infect. 2017 Oct;145(14):2998-3006. doi: 10.1017/S0950268817001923. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

Real-time genomic investigation underlying the public health response to a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 outbreak in a nursery.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health Sciences,Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,Beer-Sheva,Israel.
2
Central Laboratories,Public Health Services,Ministry of Health,Jerusalem,Israel.
3
Department of Medical Microbiology,University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen,Groningen,The Netherlands.
4
Southern District Health Office,Ministry of Health,Beer-Sheva,Israel.
5
Department of Laboratories,Public Health Services, Ministry of Health,Jerusalem,Israel.
6
European Society for Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Study Group for Genomic and Molecular Diagnostics (ESGMD),Basel,Switzerland.

Abstract

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a significant cause of gastrointestinal infection and the haemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). STEC outbreaks are commonly associated with food but animal contact is increasingly being implicated in its transmission. We report an outbreak of STEC affecting young infants at a nursery in a rural community (three HUS cases, one definite case, one probable case, three possible cases and five carriers, based on the combination of clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data) identified using culture-based and molecular techniques. The investigation identified repeated animal contact (animal farming and petting) as a likely source of STEC introduction followed by horizontal transmission. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used for real-time investigation of the incident and revealed a unique strain of STEC O26:H11 carrying stx2a and intimin. Following a public health intervention, no additional cases have occurred. This is the first STEC outbreak reported from Israel. WGS proved as a useful tool for rapid laboratory characterization and typing of the outbreak strain and informed the public health response at an early stage of this unusual outbreak.

KEYWORDS:

Escherichia coli ; Shigatoxin; haemolytic-uremic syndrome; investigation; outbreak; paediatric; whole genome sequencing

PMID:
28925349
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268817001923
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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